fluud.art

May 29th, 2012

Some excerpts from Unlikely Persona: Jerry Hunt (1943-1993)

I’ll never forget the first time I saw Jerry perform. It was in 1984 at a music festival in Ohio. The curtain opened to reveal upstage a modest clump of homemade and off-the-shelf electronic instruments. Jerry appeared from behind the setup, pushed a few buttons and began the piece. The music coming from the loudspeakers was a tapestry of sampled instruments — mainly bowed strings — constantly churning out a dense micropolyphonic web based on clusters of slow and fast trills. This was accompanied by a host of high-frequency percussive sounds emphasizing rattles, sleigh bells, wind chimes and the like. Loud and unrelenting, it reminded me of a Texas insect chorus on a hot summer night.

While this was going on, Jerry paced the stage holding a variety of homemade hand props: staffs, rattles, different kinds of wands and bells. The rattles were shaken, the staffs stamped loudly on the stage. Some of the wands were quite phallic, and Jerry would make strange motions with them as though they had magical powers. Other wands looked like religious talismans created from junk: an umbrella handle that turned into a cross at the far end, or a stylized metal rod bent into the shape of an astrological symbol. Jerry took out some strange nightlights that he plugged into electrical outlets all over the stage. Later he brought out an old brown suitcase, sat on it like a child’s hobby horse, and slapped it like a bass drum using a thick wooden stick.

The performance was redolent of shamanism, as though demons were being exorcised from the auditorium. But it came from a most unlikely persona: the lanky, bald, bespectacled Jerry Hunt, wearing his trademark unironed white dress shirt, long narrow tie, off-white jacket with unbuttoned cuffs and loose fitting trousers. It was a look I call “central Texas meat inspector” — certainly not what you’d expect from a shaman. It was amusing to watch the spectacle of this mysterious ritual being performed by an utterly mundane-looking man.


(source)

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naught.art

May 29th, 2012

page 1

The first page of Naught and the Negative, a project which I won’t begin to try to describe or understand, but love how it looks.

found via Warren Ellis

wiki.art

May 29th, 2012

Although the progenitor of my having a website, this blog went on hiatus in January 2009, and only returned in April of 2012. That’s a good long break.

In the meantime, I was spending far less time on HTML and more time on dumping links onto pages, writing small amounts of text, and doing only small amounts (by comparison with re-installing WordPress and working on the poorly-designed-website) of bit-twiddling with PmWiki.

I much prefer the PmWiki markup to WordPress’ markup — especially since WordPress has a pseudo-HTML markup (that looks like HTML, but is re-processed invisibly on the backend and transformed in ways you’d least expect.

blah blah visual editor blah blah crap blah blah I miss WordPerfect 5.1 for DOS’s reveal codes blah blah blah

What I’d like is some way to tie the two together better.
One rendering engine for both, media-images use the same warehouse, etc.

The WP FreeStyle wiki plugin adds FreeStyle-wiki markup to WordPress. Nice!
But How?
It installs an entire working instance of FreeStyle Wiki inside of WordPress.

That’s a bit of overkill just for rendering posts.

Plus, I already have a working install of PmWiki — just not inside of WordPress.

So, I have to find some way to get allow WordPress to pass arbitrary text — hopefully with wiki-markup — to PmWiki and retrieve the HTML-ified text in return (and hope that WordPress doesn’t f**k it up).

The FsWiki plugin gives me a quick idea of how to pass off the text to a renderer — it’s getting it to and from PmWiki that concerns me.

Quite possibly not difficult — I just haven’t tried it yet.

MarkupToHTML($pagename, $str)

Converts the string $str with PmWiki markup into the corresponding HTML code, assuming the current page is $pagename.

(source)

Other avenues of research include the TextControl plugin.

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